CONTINUOUS LINE DRAWING

The line in a continuous line drawing is unbroken from the beginning to the end. The drawing implement stays in uninterruped contact with the surface of the paper during the entire length of the drawing.
Jasper Johns's charcoal drawing 0 through 9 is an example of this technique.


The numbers are layered, stacked one on top of the other, all sharing the same outer edges. The numbers are transparent and slightly unintelligible, and the overlapping intersecting lines create shapes independent of the numbers themselves.

 

Once you make contact with the paper (you may begin anywhere: top, bottom, side), you are keeping the line flowing. The completed drawing gives the effect that it could be unwound or unraveled. Rather than using multiple lines, you use a single line, however, as in gesture, you draw through the forms as if they were transparent. The line connects forms, bridging spaces between objects. Not only are outside edges described, internal shapes are also drawn. A continuous, overlapping line drawing has a unified look that comes from the number of enclosed, repeated shapes that naturally occur in the drawing. The resulting composition is made up of large and small related shapes.

Again, as in gesture, try to fill the entire surface of your paper. This, too, will insure compositional unity. Let the shapes go off the page on at least three sides. Vary the weight of the line, pressing harder in those areas where you perceive a heavier weight or a shadow, or where you see the form turning into space, or in those areas of abrupt change in line direction.



Felt-tip pens, brush, pen and ink, or pencil are suggested media for continuous line drawing. Any implement that permits a free-flowing line is appropriate.

GUIDELINES FOR CONTINUOUS LINE DRAWING:

1. Use an implement that permits a free-flowing line.
2. Use an unbroken line for the entire drawing.
3. Keep your drawing implement constantly in contact with the paper.
4. Draw through the forms as if they were transparent.
5. Describe both outside edges and internal shapes.
6. Fill the entire surface of your paper, encompassing positive and negative shapes.
7. Let the shapes go off the page on at least three sides.
8. Vary the weight of the line.
9. Use continuous, overlapping lines.

ASSIGNMENT SPECIFICS:


Deliver drawing on one sheet from bond paper sketchbook 18 X 24 inches. (Before you proceed with your final drawing, do several practice drawings on paper of your choice.)